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Revell, Robert E., jr.
"Memories of South Viet-Nam," a photograph album, with maps, compiled by 1st Lt. Robert E. Revell, Jr., 25th Division, Military Police Company, Củ Chi Base Camp, Vietnam, circa 1967-1969

Photograph album of original snap shot photographs taken by an American soldier while serving in Vietnam, circa 1967-69, and related ephemeral materials, housed in a commercially manufactured album with the stamped cover title, “Memories of South Viet-Nam” - and with a map imprinted on the cover (along with a farmer plowing with two water buffaloes). This album includes:

Photographs of the troops, 43 color, 35 black-and-white, ranging in size from 3" x 3" to 4 ½" x 3". Subjects of the photographs include: Vietnamese farmers in a rice paddy; young soldiers with grenade launchers and other weapons; young Vietnamese men with military weapons; Vietnamese boy in a cart; bomb exploding in the distance; American and Vietnamese soldiers/citizens posing together with weapons; housing along a river bank in the jungle; American military police in various vehicles and situations; soldiers in armored jeeps; Vietnamese farmer harvesting his rice paddy; helicopters in formation; muddy roads; sandbagged guard post; Tay Ninh Base Camp; soldiers in tanks; fuel depot; supply depots; guard houses and check points; company streets and temporary barracks; family houseboats; Chinook helicopters; aerial views of base camp, a dead man lying on the road naked, very likely a North Vietnamese soldier, 25th Military Police Company building, amongst other views.

-Publicity photo, 5" x 7", black-n-white, of "The Golddiggers of 1970." The Golddiggers was an all female singing and dancing troupe that performed in the style of Las Vegas showgirls. The group was formed in 1968. The act debuted on The Dean Martin Show, and was later featured in a summer replacement television series over three seasons. In addition to backing Martin on his show and in his nightclub act, the group performed on their own on other TV programs, in live venues, and in three of Bob Hope's Christmas tours, which is likely how Revell obtained the photo as Bob Hope included South Vietnam in his annual Christmas shows from 1964 to 1972.

-Two uniform patches (CRTC Security Police - Ano Base; plus small American flag patch)

- 20 dong Vietnamese currency note.

-Mimeograph Map of deployment, with manuscript notes, stained, upper right side margins chipped, worn, taped at folds, measures 8" x 12".

- Mimeograph Map of Cu Chi Base Camp 25th Inf Div HQS, with manuscript notes, wear, taped on folds, measures 10" x 8".

- Copy of map of part of an air base, with runway and hangars, located near 54th & Washington, and Chamberlin Streets, city not mentioned, but it appears to be the northeast section of what is today Gulfport-Biloxi International Airport, in Gulfport, Mississippi, measures 8" x 11 ½".

 

1st Lt. Robert Elmer Revell, Jr. (1943-2003)

Robert Elmer Revell Jr., enlisted in the U.S. Army on 9 March 1967 and was released on 11 May 1969. He was born on 4 January 1943, the son of Robert Elmer Revell (1921-1970) and his wife Edna Ruth Erwin (1921-1986).  Revell's father was a veteran of World War Two, enlisting in 1942 in the Air Corps. The family appears to have lived in Muskogee City, Oklahoma, since at least 1930, they were originally from North Carolina.

Robert E. Revell, Jr. died on 20 December 2003. His last residence before his death was in Texarkana, Bowie County, Texas, where he had been living since at least 1993. Revell was buried at Fort Gibson National Cemetery, a military cemetery, in Muskogee County, OK. He had achieved the rank of 1st Lieutenant in U.S. Army. His parents are buried at the same Cemetery.

Robert E. Revell served with the 25th Division Military Police Company. He was stationed at Củ Chi Base Camp (also known as Củ Chi Army Airfield), a U.S. Army and Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) base in the Củ Chi District northwest of Saigon in southern Vietnam.

In 1957 the Army reorganized the infantry division for atomic warfare. Under this organization no military police unit was assigned at the division-level. Consequently on 1 February 1957 the 25th Military Police Company was inactivated. In the subsequent reorganization of the infantry division in 1963 a military police company was once again authorized and the 25th Military Police Company was reactivated on 21 June 1963 and reassigned to the 25th Division. The 3rd Platoon attached to the 3rd Brigade was the first element of the 25th MP Company in Vietnam arriving on 28 December 1965. The platoon received a Valorous Unit Award for actions in Quang Ngai Province before returning to the company on 1 August 1967 less personnel and equipment. The rest of the 25th MP Company arrived in Vietnam on 13 March 1966 and was based at Cu Chi.

The Củ Chi Base Camp was established in 1965 near Highway 1, 25 km northwest of Tan Son Nhut Air Base and 50 km southeast of Tây Ninh. The camp was located south of the Vietcong stronghold known as the Iron Triangle and was near, and in some cases, above the Cu Chi Tunnels. The 25th Infantry Division had its headquarters at Củ Chi from January 1966 until February 1970. It was during this time, or at least for part of it, that Sgt. Revell was stationed at Cu Chi with the 25th Military Police Company.

Besides police duties, the company provided base camp gate security, convoy escorts, control of indigenous laborers and the guarding of prisoners of war throughout the division’s area of operations. The company received campaign participation credit for twelve Vietnam campaigns receiving a Meritorious Unit Commendation, two awards of the Republic of Vietnam Cross of Gallantry and the Vietnamese Civil Action Medal. The photographs offered here in this album give a good representation of the life and duties of a military police officer during this period and location of the Vietnamese War and shows the American soldiers, their camp, the local architecture & landscape, as well as the local indigenous population. A nice artifact from the Vietnam War.