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(Mississippi – Photograph Album)
Vernacular Photograph Album containing images of Jackson, Mississippi, 1910s-1920s

oblong octavo, photograph album containing 167 black and white snapshot photographs, measuring 2” x 2 ¾” to 5” x 3”, the photo album measures 9 ½” x 6 ½”, tied cloth covered boards, photos mounted on black paper leaves, not dated, circa late 1910s early1920s.

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The album is not labeled, nor signed, but clues from the photographs appear to pinpoint the general area where the photos were taken as the city of Jackson, Mississippi. There are 36 photographs of automobiles decorated as floats for a parade, a parade sponsored perhaps by a woman’s organization as many of the automobiles contain women. There is an American Legion float, as well as a Knights of Columbus float in the parade. There are cars decorated with an acronym of “BPOE” (Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks). Some of the floats in the parade also have banners which appear to show various counties in Mississippi, as they have banners which read “East Carroll,” “Madison,” “Sharkey,” and “Yazoo,” These are all counties located in the West Central area of Mississippi. 

Jackson is the largest city and capital of the state of Mississippi. Several photos have an advertisement in the background for the “Royal Hotel.” There is a Royal Hotel listed in Jackson, Mississippi in the 1923 Automobile Blue Book. Hinds County, where the city of Jackson is located, is adjacent to Madison and Yazoo Counties, this evidence would seem to indicate the photographs were taken in the Jackson, Mississippi area. There is also an automobile with a Mississippi license plate.

Some businesses that are seen in photographs are:  Wagoener Auto Parts Co.; Standard Oil Company; Lowenthal Dry Goods, and the Royal Hotel. There are also several photos of the street scape in the downtown area and of a monument. There are also about a half a dozen photographs of soldiers, circa World War One. The album also contains approximately 20 photographs of a Standard Oil Company gas station, which appears to have been recently opened. The photos show day shots and evening photos with lights on; it also shows African-American mechanics, workers at the gas station.

Near the end of the album there are a number of photographs of children, with some adults.