Delafield, Major Joseph
Autograph Letter Signed, New York December 1, 1825 to Prof. C. A. Lipsen, care of Baron Strüve, Hamburg, Germany

quarto, 2 ¼ pages, formerly folded, in very good, clean and legible condition

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     “Sir,

         My friend the Baron de Lederer has informed me that you was inclined to bestow some society of Natural History in this Country, with a suite of your interesting Geological specimens. The members of Lyceum of Natural History in the City of New York have seen with much interest the specimens sent by you to C. R. Gibbs, and would be very desirous to offer to your acceptance such objects of Natural History of this Country, more especially minerals in exchange for a similar series to those sent to C. R. Gibbs who has deposited them in the collection of the American Geological Society.

        I have the pleasure now to forward for you acceptance the Annals of the Lyceum of Natural History of this City, having been directed by that Society to present you with a copy of the same, so far as they have been published, as a  friend and patron to the Natural Sciences I do not doubt you will be pleased to learn that in this city and throughout the country, there is much attention to them, & consequently a rapidly increasing knowledge, which tends almost daily to disclose new objects of interest. My own collection is more particularly of minerals and if you are desirous to obtain those of the United States it will afford me much pleasure to send you a selection of them…”

     Joseph Delafield (1790-1875) graduated from Yale in 1808, became a lawyer in New York, joined the New York State militia in 1810, was made Captain in 1812, and during the War of 1812 was a Captain in the regular United States army. After the war he became a Treaty of Ghent Commissioner concerned with establishing the northern border of the United States, work spanning 1817-1828.

     Scientifically he was originally interested in the collection of minerals. In 1823 he became a member of the Lyceum of Natural History in New York, founded in 1817 and now the New York Academy of Sciences, and he was the Lyceum’s President from 1827 until 1866.